Cirios-ly Traveling

We like the little town of Mulege (MOO-la-hay) because even with all the gringos around it is still very Mexican, as it should be.  We stopped in to get our laundry done, refill water, our pantry and our bellies.

display (in the laundromat) of shark jaw, shells, etc

display (in the laundromat) of shark jaw, shells, etc

Turtle shells

Turtle shells

lunch in town square

lunch in town square

knee jerks ;)

knee jerks 😉

Anders monsterThen off again, not sure how far to go but the kids were busy watching videos and Everette and I were enjoying the scenery.  You’ll hear horror stories of the Mexican highways, but if you stay alert it isn’t that bad.  There are virtually no shoulders on either side, thus putting you and the on-coming traffic close together, and a lot of the traffic is big rigs.  If close quarters bother you then you won’t like Mexican highways.  Oh, and there’s lots of pot holes, curves, debris.  Other than that, no problemo!

mtnsWe are back in the land of boulders and the boojum or cirious trees, dotting the landscape with their bizarre style of tree-dom.  Their tall trunks look like they are covered in black stubble, and their tops have tufts of yellow hairs blowing in the breeze.  Dr Seuss possibly traveled here looking for ideas for his stories.

cirios

Dark fell as we stumbled into Rancho Santa Ines where they have camping spots, a flush toilet in a small out building, and cool nights with no bugs or strong winds to give us all a good night’s sleep.

Long Day Sweltering In and Out of the Van

Some days we don’t think we’ll drive long, but then we don’t like the look or the feel of a place when we arrive so we press on, never quite sure where we’ll end up at the end of the day.

When we left El Tecolate north of La Paz out by the ferry terminal (to the mainland) we stopped in the city for a bit of shopping.  With our large crew (9 ppl) food is hard to keep in stock, particularly when we don’t have much space, and in the heat its hard to keep produce fresh and fruit-fly free.  So we seem to always be grocery shopping.

We stopped at Mega (think Mexican-type Walmart but better i.e. cleaner, tidier, etc) and had only collected some bananas in our buggy when we were approached by another gringo who asked if we were the family off a boat from Halifax.  Thea (& her dh Jonathan that we didn’t meet) has sailed from Vancouver, BC and has been in La Paz due to a boating accident she had (she lost the tips of a couple of fingers!) and is still getting physio.  But we had a delightful and encouraging visit with Thea, exchanged information.  Like many of us, they have left Canada to find a less stressful lifestyle where they can live on less money and yet have a greater standard of living.  They are at least trying it on for size, to see how it fits them.

Instead of going back out to the west coast on a secondary road we decided to put in a longer day driving north and get back up to the Bahia de Concepcion and checkout a different beach than we had camped at for near a month at Christmas. We checked out Rattlesnake Beach but weren’t thrilled about the beach.boats in water

We caught a quick break, ate a snack, Gaelyn soaked her injured big toe to clean it, and we hopped back in the muggy van with sweaty bodies and a new movie to watch.  Kids were ok to drive some more with the hopes that we could find a nice-enough place to stay for a couple of nights.  The packing/unpacking of the van is a job nobody wants to do on a daily basis and especially when its hot and muggy out.

We kept heading north figuring we had plenty of time to find a beach between Loreto and Mulege before the sun set.  But then we hit a military check that took us a whole hour to go through.  It wasn’t that we had any problems, because if we did we probably would have been held up for more than 2 hours.  But they were thoroughly checking the other vehicles, using a mirror on a long handle to walk around looking under the vehicles, unpacking cargo, looking under the hoods and in trunks.  We imagined the nightmare if we had to unpack and repack everything for them.  We thought maybe we would be camping right there with the military guys for the night.army truck

At every military checkpoint the guys eye the black boxes of tents on the roof, curious what’s in them.  Everette pulls out Booby’s business card  in hopes that it will explain what they are, and so far so good except that we are getting real low on the cards.

We pulled into Playa Requeson in the dark, a beach we had seen on our way south and knew people who had camped there.  The mosquitos were bad so we set up camp quickly and hit the sack.  See what we think about staying a couple of nights once we get up in the morning.

Our tents in the dark

Our tents in the dark

Photos Without a Home, con’t

Danaka sporting a Pacifico hat designed and created by Maret

Danaka sporting a Pacifico hat designed and created by Maret

The children love doing handstands in the water.  I think these might be Anders' legs!

The children love doing handstands in the water. I think these might be Anders’ legs!

MC jellysting Maret got nasty sting from a jellyfish, right across the side of her neck, plus her shoulders and one forearm.  They hurt for days.

view from under the palapas

view from under the palapas

 

Laars

Laars

 

Sunmarks

Sunmarks

 

vultures like to perch upon the palapas, banos and cacti.

vultures like to perch upon the palapas, banos and cacti.

 

typical surf at Los Frailes

typical surf at Los Frailes

 

 

 

 

 

 

VIEW FROM OUR KITCHEN:

Mitchell FINALLY brushed his hair

Mitchell FINALLY brushed his hair

Friday Finds: Photos without a Home

We have just past our Six Months on the Road mark, and we’ve spent 14 of those weeks here at Los Frailes.  Everette arrived home safely yesterday from 2 weeks business/family trip to BC & OR, and we are now busy packing up to pull up the stakes on Saturday.  It’s a big job to pack after we were so ‘settled’ for 3.5 months.

For where, we aren’t yet sure, but eventually north back to the States.

We are packing with excitement, sadness and apprehension.  We’ve so enjoyed being here.  The water sports have been great for so many members of the family.  We’ve had good community here with gringos and our Mexican friend, Adrian.  We’ve learned lots of new things here and had new experiences both good and bad….our rattlesnake adventures, jellyfish stings, progressing in bird and fish identification.  We’ve learned to do things differently, make different choices than I otherwise thought we would i.e.., I was adamantly against using sun screen in Canada but now that we are under the tropical sun for endless hours a day and gotten some nasty burns on the face we’ve started using waterproof stuff in specific places.  Never say Never!!

Anyways, here’s various pics that haven’t found their own place to be displayed yet, but want to be placed here with our other Los Frailes pictures before we move on.  I consider this sort of a scrapbook/journal of sorts for us, keeping our memories digital in a sense.

More pics to come over the weekend.

Bubble face

Bubble face

near Cabo Pulmo

near Cabo Pulmo

Driving with (not always) happy children

Driving with (not always) happy children

 

Danaka

Danaka

Anders likes to make himself sink to the bottom by holding onto a big rock.

Anders likes to make himself sink to the bottom by holding onto a big rock.

Mitchell trying out the GoPro on his surfboard

Mitchell trying out the GoPro on his surfboard

Empty fishing camp just over the dunes from us.  Tiburon (shark) season ended April 30th.

Empty fishing camp just over the dunes from us. Tiburon (shark) season ended April 30th.  Moist air brings fog from the south.

VIEW FROM OUR KITCHEN:
Anders inspecting a map of the surfer's beaches

Anders inspecting a map of the surfer’s beaches

Grampa Comes to Town

Some crazy rules concerning Everette’s class 1 BC driving license made it necessary for him to take a trip back to rectify things before we start heading north on the Baja.  So, he fit in some business, and a week stay with our daughter and her family in Portland.  He’ll join us back in hot Baja in a couple of days, of course we are counting down our sleeps, all excited to have him back with us.

Here are some pics of Everette/Grampa on his travels.

Layne with 3D Art

Layne with 3D Art

It's not Mexico, but Rauchelle is tasting her first tamale.

It’s not Mexico, but Rauchelle is tasting her first tamale.

KISSES LIKE

Happy Grampa

Happy Grampa

Our Sweetheart

Our Sweetheart

Standing with her daddy

Standing with her daddy

 

VIEW FROM OUR KITCHEN:

Mitchell spends his evenings reading in his tent

Mitchell spends his evenings reading in his tent